Sou Fujimoto unveils virtual installation in London

Sou Fujimoto unveils virtual installation in London

The Japanese architect choose to use virtuality rather than physical elements for placemaking at this year’s London Design Festival—his installation Medusa can be seen through the lens of mixed-reality glasses at the Victoria & Albert Museum.

Using the glasses, fifty visitors at a time can enjoy a unique spatial experience, created with the help of the Tin Drum studio. The installation observes the visitors’ collective movement and the dynamics of the elements in the virtual space are constantly changing along with it. The work is named Medusa after the Greek mythological monster, but according to the creators, the beauty and unpredictability of the jellyfish are also characterizing the installation. Sou Fujimoto’s aim was to explore the potential of light as an architectural medium, using the play of the Northern Lights as a source of inspiration.

Programs of the London Design Festival 2021 can be visited from 18-26 September 2021.

Source: Dezeen

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