Tallinn approves new passenger terminal plan

Tallinn approves new passenger terminal plan

The Tallinn City Council approved the Rail Baltic Ülemiste passenger terminal project back in December, which aims to improve public transport in the Estonian capital.


According to the plans, an area of 11.47 hectares in the Ülemiste district will be transformed into a transport hub connecting different means of transport. The new terminal building will include three platforms, a bus station, and a commercial building. There will be several means of access, a new cycle lane created, and a speed limit reduced to 30 km/h.

According to Deputy Mayor Madle Lippus, the Ülemiste terminal development supports the city’s strategic goal of attracting more people to travel by public transport, by making it more convenient. The plans are by Zaha Hadid Architects and the construction and engineering firm Esplan OÜ. The terminal and its surrounding are are due to be completed by the end of 2026.

Source: news.err.ee

more to read
If you thought that waiting for a bus was boring...
design

If you thought that waiting for a bus was boring...

An ingenious solution was found in Kobeřice, near the city of Brno. For this village of seven hundred inhabitants, architects at Atelier Walter designed a multifunctional wonder where you can spend your waiting time with a little sightseeing. Atelier Walter has designed a compact bus stop that, despite its size,
The region’s largest film studio to be built in Fót
design

The region’s largest film studio to be built in Fót

The studio will be virtual, meaning that instead of physical sets, it will have LED walls as backdrops, but in return, it could be ready as early as next year. Visual Europe Group Hungary is completing an €11 million investment in the HelloParks complex in Fót, Hungary. The idea behind
Could AI solve mankind’s greatest mysteries?
design

Could AI solve mankind’s greatest mysteries?

The creator of the Persian Pillow project has simulated how the ancient pyramids might have been built with the help of Midjourney—only this time, using pillows. AI artist Ulises took an object found in everyone’s home—the pillow—and used it to recreate one of the greatest wonders