Medieval rock wall with a Brutalist addition

Medieval rock wall with a Brutalist addition

The castle wall built in the hillside of Castelgrande in Switzerland was restored back in the eighties – in a quite unconventional manner, we must say. The Brutalist addition was captured by Simone Bossi on jaw-dropping shots.

They started to transform the giant rocks of Castelgrande in Bellinzona into a castle wall in the 13th century to make the fortress easier to access through it. The rock wall already impressive in its original condition has become even more astonishing in the 1980s, owing to the Brutalist renovation designs of Swiss architect Aurelio Galfetti.

The geometric, rigid concrete gate incorporated into the raw rocks looks surreal. And now the photos of Italian photographer Simone Bossi allow all of us to admire how centuries blend into each other.

Source: designboom

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