A new book reveals the architectural changes of the Barbie Dreamhouse

A new book reveals the architectural changes of the Barbie Dreamhouse

Barbie Dreamhouse: An Architectural Survey traces the evolution of the world’s best-known dollhouse from its first appearance in 1962 to its latest design in 2021.


To mark the 60th anniversary of the Barbie Dreamhouse, Mattel Creations and architectural magazine Pin-Up have jointly published a book that explores the evolution of the dollhouse through architectural drawings, photographs, interviews with designers and essays. “The book explores the machinations of our collective domestic fantasies through the mix of architectural history and popular culture. Since the first Dreamhouse in 1962, Barbie’s homes have transformed and evolved, richly quoting 20th- and early 21st-century architecture and design history. Our book documents the impact Barbie has had on the global architectural imagination,” say Felix Burrichter and Whitney Mallett.

Source: wallpaper.com

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