Favorite interiors of the week_64

Favorite interiors of the week_64

Each week, we share the most gorgeous, inspiring and coolest interiors that we’ve come across in the past few days. Here comes some perfect eye candy to browse through while sipping your Saturday morning coffee, which you can also use as inspiration for your own home. This week’s selection will get you right into holiday mode—join us while we take a peek into an old townhouse in Mallorca, a luxury hotel in Croatia and a Mexican hacienda, among others!

A 100-year-old townhouse in Mallorca, refurbished | Durietz Design | Alaró, Spain


Luxury hotel on the island of Hvar | LA.M Studio | Maslina, Croatia


Lisbon’s hottest rooftop bar | Studio PIM | Lisbon, Portugal


Puritan heaven for concrete lovers | DGN Studio | London, UK


Lush oasis in an old factory building | Richaud Arquitectura | Mexico City, Mexico


Impressive use of materials in a Berlin apartment | Ester Bruzkus Architekten | Berlin, Germany


Mid-century tailored to Japanese aesthetic | Norm Architects | Tokyo, Japan

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