Travel to Mars from a square in Prague

Travel to Mars from a square in Prague

Architect studio Jiri Prihoda takes passersby to the Mars with an impressive, shell-shaped architectural installation.

The extravagant installation of architect studio Jiri Prihoda on the square of office center Rustonka, Prague looks as though it was dropped straight from space, even though the shell-shaped mirroring structure made of stainless steel does not evoke either a spaceship or a Martian home. It looks more of a roll of film, with a LED screen at the end, allowing pedestrians to take a look around Mars.

The screen of the installation measuring twelve meters in diameter and seven meters in height currently shows NASA’s previously recorded imagery of the Mars landscape, but once made publicly available, real-time footage will be streamed of Mars’ vista.

Source: designboom

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