Favorite interiors of the week_17

Favorite interiors of the week_17

Each week, we share the most gorgeous, inspiring and coolest interiors that we’ve come across in the past few days. Here comes some perfect eye candy to browse through while sipping your Saturday morning coffee, which you can also use as inspiration for your own homes. Before we throw ourselves into the holidays, let’s see the interiors that caught our attention this week, from Madrid to Warsaw.

Orange trees and recycled interior in a restaurant | Lucas Munoz | Madrid, Spain


Geometric shapes and unique furniture | EM2 | Gdynia, Poland


Family life amidst brick walls | Martin Skoček | Bratislava, Slovakia


The many shades of wood | Studio Razavi | Paris, France


Parisian atmosphere in Warsaw | ACV Interiors | Warsaw, Poland


Playing with levels in an urban suite | Mas-aqui | Barcelona, Spain


Pastel harmony on 123 square meters | Lera Brumina | Kiev, Ukraine

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